Neuronale Netze Links

Neuronale Netze: Funktionsweise

Dokumentation von Michael Nielsen
Ausführliche Erklärung der Funktionsweise neuronaler Netze mit Übungen

Deeplearning.net
Reichhaltige Linksammlung rund um maschinelles Lernen (Tutorials, Datenquellen, Software, Demos)

Tutorials

Deep Learning Tutorial
von Andrew Ng mit Code Beispielen

DIY Deep Learning for Vision with Caffe
Tutorial presentation

Yann LeCun: Materialsammlung

Google+ Deep Learning Community
News und Diskussionen rund um Deep Learning, Neuronale Netze und Feature Learning

Andrew Ng Maschinelles Lernen
Coursera Kurs, Video: Neuronale Netze, Support Vector Machines, (un)überwachtes Lernen

Geoffrey Hinton: Neuronale Netze
Coursera Kurs, Video

Demos

Andrej Karpathy’s Blog
Andrej Karpathy erklärt anhand eines auf die Bewertung von Selfies trainirten neuronalen Netzes sehr anschaulich und unterhaltsam, wie Deep Learning funktioniert

Demo von KI-Experte Matthew Zeiler
Clarifai klassifiziert Bilder (Upload oder URL)

Convolution Live-Berechnung
Live-Berechnung einer Feature Map

Frameworks

Caffe
Deep Learning Framework

How To Start a Python Script on Linux Boot using Systemd

Systemd is a system manager and the new Linux init system. This guide shows how to start a Python application with the systemctl command.

Create a systemd service file

As the root user, create an application.service file in the /etc/systemd/system directory. You can name the application in whatever you want.

$ vi /etc/systemd/system/application.service

Write the following content into the file:

[Unit]
Description=Python Service Script
After=network.target

[Service]
Type=idle
ExecStart=/usr/local/bin/applicaton.py

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target

Enable and start the application as a service

After saving the file, reload the systemd daemon so that it knows about the new service.

$ systemctl daemon-reload
$ systemctl enable application.service

Start the Application service by typing

$ systemctl start application.service

or only

$ systemctl start application

Show the status, if the service is started

$ systemctl status application

Now the service should start by each start of the system.

How To Run a Java Application on Linux using Systemd

Systemd is a system manager and the new Linux init system. This guide shows how to start a Java application with the systemctl command.

Create Java Application User

For security purposes, the application should be run as an unprivileged user (i.e. not root). We will create a new user and group that will run the application service.

First, create a new jvmapp group:

$ sudo groupadd -r jvmapp

Next, create a new jvmapp user. This user should be a member of the former created jvmapp group, with a home directory of where the location of the application is (e.g. /opt/application), and with a shell of /bin/false (so nobody is able to log into the account)

$ sudo useradd -r -g jvmapp -s /bin/false -d /opt/application jvmapp

Now, your jvmapp user is set up.

Create a systemd Service File

As the user root, create a application.service file in the /etc/systemd/system directory.

$ vi /etc/systemd/system/application.service

Write the following content inside the file.

[Unit]
Description=Java Application Service
After=network.target

[Service]
ExecStart=/path/to/java -jar /path/to/application.jar

User=jvmapp
Group=jvmapp

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target

Start the application as a service

After saving the file, reload the systemd daemon so that it knows about the new service.

$ systemctl daemon-reload

Start the Application service by typing

$ systemctl start application

Show the status, if the service is started

$ systemctl status application

Now the service should start by each start of the system.

How To Run Apache Tomcat8 on Linux using Systemd

Introduction

Systemd is a system manager and init system that is becoming a new standard for Linux operating systems. This guide show how to start Apache Tomcat8 with the systemctl command.

Prerequisites

A running Linux maschine with systemd enabled, installed Java JDK, an Apache Tomcat 8 and for security reasons an unprivileged tomcat user.

Create a systemd Service File

To run Tomcat as a service, a systemd service file is needed. We also have to know where the Java JDK is installed.

As the user root, create a tomcat8.service file in the /etc/systemd/system directory:

$ vi /etc/systemd/system/tomcat8.service

The following content has to be in the service file. You can modify the environment variables for your needs.

[Unit]
Description=Apache Tomcat Web Application Container
After=network.target

[Service]
Type=forking

Environment=JAVA_HOME=/usr/lib/jvm/java-8-oracle/jre
Environment=CATALINA_PID=/var/run/tomcat8.pid
Environment=CATALINA_HOME=/opt/tomcat8
Environment=CATALINA_BASE=/opt/tomcat8
Environment='CATALINA_OPTS=-Xms512M -Xmx=1024M -server \
-XX:+UseParallelGC'
Environment='JAVA_OPTS=-Djava.awt.headless=true \
-Djava.security.egd=file:/dev/./urandom'

ExecStart=/opt/tomcat8/bin/startup.sh
ExecStop=/opt/tomcat8/bin/shutdown.sh

User=tomcat8
Group=tomcat8
RestartSec=10
Restart=always

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target

Start the Tomcat service

After editing the file, reload the systemd daemon so that it knows about the new service file.

$ systemctl daemon-reload

Start the Tomcat service by typing

$ systemctl start tomcat8

Show the status that it was started

$ systemctl status tomcat8

Open your webbrowser and go to http://localhost:8080

How To Install Apache Tomcat 8 on Ubuntu Server 14.04

Introduction

Apache Tomcat is a web application container that is used to serve Java servlet applications. This How To covers the basic installation of Tomcat 8 on a Ubuntu Server 14.04.

Prerequisites

You need a running Ubuntu Server 14.04 installation, an actual Java JDK version 7 or 8.

Create a Tomcat User

For security reasons, Tomcat should be run as an unprivileged user. So, we will create a new Tomcat user and group that will run the Tomcat service.

Create a new Tomcat group:

$ sudo groupadd tomcat

Then we create a new Tomcat user, which is a member of the Tomcat group, with a home directory of /tmp with the following command:

$ sudo useradd -s /bin/false -g tomcat -d /tmp tomcat

Our Tomcat user is set up.

Install Tomcat

You have to download the latest Tomcat 8 binary distribution and extract the packed file into the /opt directory and rename the Tomcat installation directory to tomcat8:

$ cd /opt
$ sudo tar xvfz apache-tomcat-8*tar.gz
$ sudo mv apache-tomcat8* tomcat8

Update Permissions

We give the Tomcat user write/read access to specific files and directories:

Change into Tomcat installation path:

$ cd /opt/tomcat8

Set the permissions:

$ sudo chgrp -R tomcat conf
$ sudo chmod g+rwx conf
$ sudo chmod g+r conf/*

We have also to make the Tomcat user the owner of the work, temp, and logs directories:

$ sudo chmod -R tomcat work/ temp/ logs/

Install Upstart Script

Because we want to run Tomcat as a service, we neet to set up an Upstart script.

Create an Upstart script:

$ sudo vi /etc/init/tomcat.conf

Copy and paste the following script into the created tomcat.conf file:

description "Tomcat8 Production Server"

start on runlevel [2345]
stop on runlevel [!2345]
respawn
respawn limit 10 5

setuid tomcat
setgid tomcat

env JAVA_HOME=/usr/lib/jvm/java-8-oracle/jre
env CATALINA_HOME=/opt/tomcat8-prod

# Modify these options as needed
env JAVA_OPTS="-Djava.awt.headless=true -Djava.security.egd=file:/dev/./urandom"
env CATALINA_OPTS="-Xms512M -Xmx1024M -server -XX:+UseParallelGC"

exec $CATALINA_HOME/bin/catalina.sh run

# cleanup temp directory after stop
post-stop script
 rm -rf $CATALINA_HOME/temp/*
end script

This script is used to run the Tomcat service with the unprivileged Tomcat user.

Now we need to reload the Upstart configuration:

$ sudo initctl reload-configuration

Let’s start the Tomcat service with the following command:

$ sudo initctl start tomcat

Tomcat is now running and accessable with the domain or IP address followed by the default port :8080 in a web browser. Open the URL http://server_IP_address:8080 in w web browser.